Field Chicken
ome languages use euphemisms to talk about meat without mentioning the animal it comes from. In English, we say “beef” instead of “cow meat”, “mutton” instead of “sheep meat”, “pork” instead of “pig meat”, and sometimes even “venison” instead of “deer meat.” All of these words are from French, as they too avoid such terms, saying “bœuf” and “porc”, rather than specifying the animals involved. On the other hand, fish and poultry are usually just named after the creatures they come from, as in “chicken” and “salmon” in English, or their French counterparts “poulet” and “saumon”. In Chinese, they do say “cow meat” (牛肉), “sheep meat” (羊肉), etc., but when it comes to frog meat, much of China uses the euphemism “field chicken” (田鸡). As for dog meat, which has become a very controversial food in East Asia, those who eat it sometimes call it “fragrant meat” (香肉) and sometimes just “dog meat” (狗肉), while the people who want it banned would only ever call it “dog meat”. In many languages, whatever meat is most popular is simply called “meat”. The Spanish word for “meat” — carne — is also used in many places to mean “beef”. In Chinese, the word for “meat” —  (ro) — is understood to mean “pork” unless some other animal is specified.
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In China, bull penis is sometimes eaten, usually as part of a medicinal dish, and to make it sound a little less nasty they use the euphemism “bull whip.” In English, “bullwhip” already means a type of whip used to drive cattle, so this sign from a Chinese grocer in Los Angeles calls it “pizzle”, an archaic word  for an animal’s member that’s still used today in the meat industry.
Field Chicken
ome languages use euphemisms to talk about meat without mentioning the animal it comes from. In English, we say “beef” instead of “cow meat”, “mutton” instead of “sheep meat”, “pork” instead of “pig meat”, and sometimes even “venison” instead of “deer meat.” All of these words are from French, as they too avoid such terms, saying “bœuf” and “porc”, rather than specifying the animals involved. On the other hand, fish and poultry are usually just named after the creatures they come from, as in “chicken” and “salmon” in English, or their French counterparts “poulet” and “saumon”. In Chinese, they do say “cow meat” (牛肉), “sheep meat” (羊肉), etc., but when it comes to frog meat, much of China uses the euphemism “field chicken” (田鸡). As for dog meat, which has become a very controversial food in East Asia, those who eat it sometimes call it “fragrant meat” ( ) and sometimes just “dog meat” (狗肉), while the people who want it banned would only ever call it “dog meat”. In many languages, whatever meat is most popular is simply called “meat”. The Spanish word for “meat” — carne — is also used in many places to mean “beef”. In Chinese, the word for “meat” —  (ro) — is understood to mean “pork” unless some other animal is specified.
S
In China, bull penis is sometimes eaten, usually as part of a medicinal dish, and to make it sound a little less nasty they use the euphemism “bull whip.” In English, “bullwhip” already means a type of whip used to drive cattle, so this sign from a Chinese grocer in Los Angeles calls it “pizzle”, an archaic word  for an animal’s member that’s still used today in the meat industry.